some of my most vivid memories from childhood were my fever dreams. it seemed like a couple times a year i’d get horribly sick and enter this nightmare hellscape, and each time as the sickness came on i’d get more and more anxious about having to deal with these nightmares again. i tried to explain them to my mom but was too young, so it sounded like gibberish. i would get frustrated and angry, and try to stay awake, but i never could. then the walls would start pulsing, in and out, and on each inward pulse they’d contract closer and closer. i’d lie there, unable to move or to scream, waiting for the walls to collapse in on me. and as they got so close that they began to touch i would feel something dragging me, a presence like emptiness sucking me in. the worst is that i could never explain these dreams, because i was too young and couldn’t form the words.

aaaaaand then i shit my pants. this keeps getting better and better

this might be the most sick i’ve ever been. what bothers me most is that i haven’t eaten in a good four days so i’m probably going to come out of this having lost all the weight i’ve worked so hard to put on. of course, it’s absolutely my fault for getting sick since i know exactly what caused it.

ingthing:

beamkatanachronicles:

thepurpleeyedone:

beamkatanachronicles:

thepurpleeyedone:

beamkatanachronicles:

appleseeddrama:

THEY HAVE THE ACE ATTORNEY OFFICIAL MANGA IN MY LAW LIBRARY I AM CRYING.



Your honor, something is amiss here!
As you are probably aware, library materials are labeled with barcodes as well as a number to determine their location on the shelf, as per the Dewey Decimal System. The books just to the left of the manga are labeled, as are the DVDs just in view on the lower shelf. Look even further behind these shelves and you’ll see that even those books are labeled! 
Ladies and gentlemen of the courtroom, I invite you to take a closer look at the volumes that are, allegedly, part of this law library! Something is missing from the spines, isn’t there?

Where are the bar codes?!
This is a blatant contradiction! The OP is lying— these volumes cannot, therefore, be a part of this library at all! I propose that they simply brought these materials in for the sake of the joke!! 


Only focusing on one aspect and not the whole of the issue, are we, Mr. Wright? Typical.

Your honor, if you bring your attention to the books just left of the manga, you’ll notice there’s a book (the second to the left) that also does not have a bar code.

If you examine the picture even closer—particularly the DVDs below—you’ll see that they bear bar codes, but not on the spines. No, they have them on the back and/or front of the DVDs. Of course, this method of labeling and organizing isn’t limited to products of the film industry alone.

Therefore, I’d like to propose that it is entirely possible that the manga books do, in fact, belong to the library!


Wh-WHAAAAT?! You’re kidding!! 
(Shoot, he’s got me there… Better think of something fast! Something about the books that sets them apart from—
…! I’ve got it!)
While that may be true, you’ve also overlooked one critical error: the titles of the books! Whether or not your hypothesis regarding the labeling system is correct, these titles aren’t alphabetized correctly! What kind of self-respecting librarian would misplace such vital books? 
Well, Edgeworth?



While it pains me to have to point out something so obvious, I suppose I’ll make an exception for you, Wright.
Clearly, one look at the titles of the books next to the manga is a tell-all of this certain library’s less-than-stellar organization skills. None of the books are in alphabetical order, I’m afraid.

They could very well be alphabetized by author and not title, but it’s a little difficult to be able to decipher that from this single picture, wouldn’t you say?
Furthermore, the manga books themselves are in numerical order, suggesting some kind of system is in place, albeit not a very good one, if the alphabetizing is off.

At the end of the day, it seems like neither of us can draw a clear conclusion from this evidence alone. Your honor, I strongly suggest a recess in which we could investigate the library itself further.

I see the issue here very clearly.
Due to the uncertain nature of this case, we’ll have to postpone this decision until more decisive evidence can be obtained. The court will now take a 15-minute recess.

(W-wait, but I’m not—)


WAIT!!!

I’ve got some decisive evidence for you, pal!

We investigated further into the photo. Zooming in, you can see a label on the DVD case to the bottom left.

Photo Close-up added to the court record!


As you can see, pal, you can vaguely see the words “Of Toledo Law Library” on the label!

And, considering possibilities of the rest of that label, “University of Toledo" was the first to come to my mind!
A quick search on the University of Toledo’s Online Law Library Database revealed that there ARE the comics pictured in it!
Miles Edgeworth Ace Attorney Investigations volumes 1-4 and Phoenix Wright Ace Attorney volumes 1-5!

And there’s more! 
The section these comics are filed under is the “Law in Popular Culture" Section, which matches up with the titles on the rest of the books on that shelf: "Lowering the Bar: Lawyer Jokes & Legal Culture”, “Prime Time Law”, “Lawyers in Your Living Room!" and "Lex Populi”!
Not only is it in the right section, it’s also a documented part of the Law Library’s database!
How’s that for decisive evidence?

ingthing:

beamkatanachronicles:

thepurpleeyedone:

beamkatanachronicles:

thepurpleeyedone:

beamkatanachronicles:

appleseeddrama:

THEY HAVE THE ACE ATTORNEY OFFICIAL MANGA IN MY LAW LIBRARY I AM CRYING.

image

image

Your honor, something is amiss here!

As you are probably aware, library materials are labeled with barcodes as well as a number to determine their location on the shelf, as per the Dewey Decimal System. The books just to the left of the manga are labeled, as are the DVDs just in view on the lower shelf. Look even further behind these shelves and you’ll see that even those books are labeled! 

Ladies and gentlemen of the courtroom, I invite you to take a closer look at the volumes that are, allegedly, part of this law library! Something is missing from the spines, isn’t there?

image

Where are the bar codes?!

This is a blatant contradiction! The OP is lying— these volumes cannot, therefore, be a part of this library at all! I propose that they simply brought these materials in for the sake of the joke!! 

Only focusing on one aspect and not the whole of the issue, are we, Mr. Wright? Typical.

Your honor, if you bring your attention to the books just left of the manga, you’ll notice there’s a book (the second to the left) that also does not have a bar code.

If you examine the picture even closer—particularly the DVDs below—you’ll see that they bear bar codes, but not on the spines. No, they have them on the back and/or front of the DVDs. Of course, this method of labeling and organizing isn’t limited to products of the film industry alone.

Therefore, I’d like to propose that it is entirely possible that the manga books do, in fact, belong to the library!

image

Wh-WHAAAAT?! You’re kidding!! 

image
(Shoot, he’s got me there… Better think of something fast! Something about the books that sets them apart from—

image
…! I’ve got it!)

While that may be true, you’ve also overlooked one critical error: the titles of the books! Whether or not your hypothesis regarding the labeling system is correct, these titles aren’t alphabetized correctly! What kind of self-respecting librarian would misplace such vital books? 

Well, Edgeworth?

While it pains me to have to point out something so obvious, I suppose I’ll make an exception for you, Wright.

Clearly, one look at the titles of the books next to the manga is a tell-all of this certain library’s less-than-stellar organization skills. None of the books are in alphabetical order, I’m afraid.

They could very well be alphabetized by author and not title, but it’s a little difficult to be able to decipher that from this single picture, wouldn’t you say?

Furthermore, the manga books themselves are in numerical order, suggesting some kind of system is in place, albeit not a very good one, if the alphabetizing is off.

At the end of the day, it seems like neither of us can draw a clear conclusion from this evidence alone. Your honor, I strongly suggest a recess in which we could investigate the library itself further.

I see the issue here very clearly.

image
Due to the uncertain nature of this case, we’ll have to postpone this decision until more decisive evidence can be obtained. The court will now take a 15-minute recess.

image

(W-wait, but I’m not—)

image

WAIT!!!

I’ve got some decisive evidence for you, pal!

We investigated further into the photo. Zooming in, you can see a label on the DVD case to the bottom left.

Photo Close-up added to the court record!

As you can see, pal, you can vaguely see the words “Of Toledo Law Library” on the label!

And, considering possibilities of the rest of that label, “University of Toledo" was the first to come to my mind!

A quick search on the University of Toledo’s Online Law Library Database revealed that there ARE the comics pictured in it!

Miles Edgeworth Ace Attorney Investigations volumes 1-4 and Phoenix Wright Ace Attorney volumes 1-5!

And there’s more! 

The section these comics are filed under is the “Law in Popular Culture" Section, which matches up with the titles on the rest of the books on that shelf: "Lowering the Bar: Lawyer Jokes & Legal Culture”, “Prime Time Law”, “Lawyers in Your Living Room!" and "Lex Populi”!

Not only is it in the right section, it’s also a documented part of the Law Library’s database!

How’s that for decisive evidence?

erikkwakkel:

Making Shakespeare

Today in 1616 William Shakespeare died. His works have been enjoyed by generations of readers, which means that generations of printers have been busy editing and reprinting his texts. The images above are special. They are from the 1791 edition of The Bard’s “dramatic works”, as the title page has it, which included his play Richard III. Except, these images don’t show the actual book. You are looking at the proofs corrected by the editor George Steevens himself, which miraculously survived.

The proofs show the editor at work. Using the 1790 text of Malone as a basis, Steevens changed Shakespeare’s words into what he thought was the best text to print. Words were deleted (“guilty” and “done” are crossed out), clarifications were added (a character exited “with the body”, penned next to it), and entire passages appear to have been rewritten (note the pasted pieces of paper with Steevens handwritten text). The proofs seen here show how Shakespeare is prepared for a new generation of readers: his words were perfected to reach a new audience - and new potential buyers.

Pic: Washington, Shakespeare Library, PR2752 1791-1802a v.1 Sh.Col. (This Shakespeare edition of 1791). Here is my source and more information.

“He is also credited with bringing the sport of canoeing to the United States.”

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Livingston_Alden

hmm, uh, no.